Guantanamo ends now.

5141_Guantanamo wheelbarrow_1_460x230

 

(Photo’s credits to Avaaz.org)

Today I won’t share my own words but rather another thoughtful and urgent campaign by the Avaaz team. Debate has been going on for years, but now the issue is hotter than ever. Signing this petition would mean showing a contribution to and support, even if passive, the closure of Guantanamo prison camp.

“If any other country were treating prisoners the way we are treating those in Guantánamo we would roundly and rightly criticize that country. We can never retake the legal and moral high ground when we claim the right to do unto others that which we would vehemently condemn if done to one of us.” Col Morris Davis, a former chief prosecutor for terrorism trials at Guantanamo Bay said on regards to the launch of his acclaimed petition on the Website Change.org.

Davis’s petition came after President Barack Obama vowed on 30 April, 2013 to make good on a broken 2008 campaign promise to shutter the prison camp, which still houses some 166 prisoners despite more than half having been cleared for release. The petition reached 60.000 signatures in less than 24 hours.

Here below you can find a short but interesting video shot by The Guardian. David Remes, a human rights lawyer, represents 17 Guantanamo prisoners and explains the conditions of his clients at the bay.

Some facts from Avaaz:

• Detainees in Guantanamo now: 166
• Detainees facing active charges: 6
• Detainees cleared for immediate release, but stuck in the camp: 86
• Guantanamo inmates on hunger strike: 103
• Hunger strikers strapped down and force fed: 30
• Prisoners who have died in custody: 9
• Children the US has held at Guantanamo: 21
• Detainees tried in civilian court: 1
• Detainees who can’t be tried for lack of evidence or torture: 50
• Prisoners released by the Bush administration: 500+
• Prisoners released by the Obama administration: 72
• Current annual cost to US taxpayers: $150 million
• Days since Obama first pledged to close Gitmo: 1579
• Time since first prisoners arrived at Guantanamo: 11 years, 4 months, 11 days

 

I guess there is nothing more to add.

SIGN AND SHARE.

 

Laura Zuffi

 

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